Curtains – Finished & Hanging

Curtain Project Completed.

Curtain Project Completed.

I did it!  Huzzah!

Nearly ten yards of fabric woven, sewn and hemmed, and hanging on my bedroom windows.  I haven’t ironed this much since I wore silk blouses to work in the 1990s.

Close up of the Huck Lace Pattern

Curtains in Huck Lace

Ellie usually finds a way to sit on newly woven fabric.  I’m sure she thinks it is her right.  She was determined to get cozy on all that white and pestered the heck out of me after the fabric came off the loom.

When I unrolled the soon-to-be-curtains from the cloth beam and all those sticks hit the floor, The doggie was there in a flash.  And then, when I ironed the cloth after its initial washing, that little pest hovered beneath the ironing board.  I had to give her a dozen treats to distract her.

Click on this photo for a closer look at the lace.

Click on this photo for a closer look at the lace.

After I finished the sewing and gave the curtains their final ironing,  Ellie did manage to find her way onto the sheets I put below the ironing board to keep the fabric off the floor.  I hadn’t the heart to tell her she wasn’t reclining on the real thing.

Next project:  My first wool rug.  My sister sent me a cut warp she got at a sale and some odds and ends of wool she had in her yarn cache and told me, “See what you can do with that.”

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19 thoughts on “Curtains – Finished & Hanging

    • Thanks, Kerry, I was most nervous when I had to take scissors to the fabric. I put it off for what seemed like hours until I heard my step-father’s voice in my head, “Measure twice, cut once.” And I ignored the echo of his laughing phrase, “I cut it off three times and it still was too short.”

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      • Jen, my floor loom is an old LeClerc Nilus with four harnesses and a 45″ weaving width which I bought nearly two years ago. It had some interesting issues when I got it. Some I knew about and others I found as I learned to weave. (See my blog article, Loom Remodeling Job). Eventually, I’d like to have an eight harness loom, but there still is a lot to learn on this one.

        Luckily, I have some excellent resources. My little sister is a master weaver, and although she lives far from me, she is as close as Skype on which we can compare notes and troubleshoot problems. Also, I have just about every weaving book from the recognized masters: Davison, Black, Atwater, Redding, the Collingwoods, and many of the younger experts.

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    • Thank you, Phyllis. All the girls (4 of us) in my family worked with fabric from very early ages. As the eldest, I helped teach the younger ones. It was up to me to see the work was done right. I was a tough taskmaster. Each of us began with doll clothes and went on from there. One of my sisters (my youngest) became an accomplished weaver and recently taught me to weave. With the tables finally turned, my work has to be done to suit her or she may not help me in the future.

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